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Journal of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Sciences ISSN: 1307-7384
2009, Volume 12, Number 2, Page(s) 051-058
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RESPONSIVENESS OF THE FUNCTIONAL MOBILITY SCALE FOR CHILDREN WITH CEREBRAL PALSY
Adrienne Harvey1, H Kerr Graham4, Richard Baker3, Meg E Morris2
11 Hugh Williamson Gait Laboratory, Parkville, Victoria, Australia
2University of Melbourne, School of Physiotherapy, Parkville, Victoria, Australia
3Murdoch Children's Research Institute, Gait CCRE, Parkville, Victoria, Australia
2Royal Children's Hospital, Department of Orthopaedics, Parkville, Victoria, Australia
Summary
Objective: This study examined the ability of the Functional Mobility Scale (FMS) to detect minimal clinically important differences in mobility status in children with cerebral palsy (CP) having interventions.

Materials and methods: This prospective longitudinal study of instrument validation was conducted in a tertiary care paediatric hospital. A population-based sample of 84 children with CP aged 2-16 years (mean age 8.8 years), GMFCS levels I-IV recruited from CP clinics. Children had orthopaedic surgery for deformity correction and gait deviations, including single event multilevel surgery (SEMLS) or spasticity management with botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT-A). Responsiveness of the FMS was examined using change scores and correlation with an external criterion, the Functional Assessment Questionnaire (FAQ) at four time points following the interventions. Comparison of the SEMLS and botulinum groups was used to examine the ability of the FMS to detect both change and stability in mobility status.

Results: Correlation of changes score between the FMS and FAQ showed six significant correlations, however the correlations were low overall (Spearman rho 0.01-0.36). More change on the FMS was seen in children who had SEMLS compared to those who had botulinum toxin injections.

Conclusion: The FMS was able to detect minimal clinically significant change in mobility in children with CP who had orthopaedic surgery and spasticity management.

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